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Micah True - aka Caballo Blanco (The a White Horse) www.ultracb.com

Micah True – aka Caballo Blanco (The a White Horse) http://www.ultracb.com


The other day I was contemplating the economy. Not something I usually do. But a question popped up I could not shake:

“Why does our economy have to grow?”

Now, every economist in the world will be able to give me a plethora of reasons. I even thought of a few myself. But here is the thing: I will bet that every one has as it’s core the need for someone else to continue to make money, and more of it. So one might say, “The economy has to grow so we can employ people as the population grows.” True – but you could employ more people now without the same growth if some of the executives in your company were happy to take home a little less pay. Or the shareholders were happy to take home a little less dividend.

As I chewed this, the concept of Korima came up. Korima is a concept within the culture of the Tarahumara people (also known as the Raramuri). Basically Korima means “What I have, you have too.” It is a simple way of ensuring everyone in the community has what they need to survive. At the same time, nobody presupposes Korima will save them and therefore the Raramuri do not allow it to be a motivation to laziness. This is no communist system in that sense – but instead a commitment to ensuring that nobody in the community lacks anything.

Korima is a challenging concept because it demands that I recognise that I have more than enough; and the more is capable of being given to one who has little. And that even if I think I have (or do actually have) little, I will always have enough to give something to someone with less.

I first became aware of Korima through a man who became my mentor in running and in life. Micah True first moved to the Copper Canyons to live with the Tarahumara to learn how to run from them. (Hint: if you want the full story read Born to Run). But he learned so much more. One of those things was Korima and he was so taken by it that he began to embrace and practice it in his own life.

Korima shone through in everything Micah True (known to the Tarahumara as Caballo Blanco – The White Horse) did. And as he mixed in the running community, he mixed the two and carved out a community among us runners that practiced Korima among ourselves. Unfortunately Micah True passed away two years ago this week while out on a run in the Canyons. But his legacy loves on, especially among the trail and ultra communities that I mix in.

Maybe Korima is not only a great way to start making change (see last week’s post) but also a way to discover what it means to be truly human? What I do know is that John Lennon was right – if people wanted peace more than a TV, we’d have peace – and that Korima might hold the key…

Live Simply and Simply Live
Mark G

(picture sourced from http://www.ultracb.com)

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This is our simple table.

Our simple table was built by hand. It’s wood was first used to build the grandstand at the Stanthorpe Showgrounds in Queensland, Australia in 1905. The craftsman rescued the wood when it was pulled down in the early 90’s and made furniture with it. Our table was built in 1994.

Our table was the first major furniture purchase we made as a married couple. We bought it not long after it was made. We loved it’s size, it’s history and it’s simplicity. We loved that it was strong and robust and built to last – like we hoped our love would. It had to last because we bought it never intending to part with it. And we knew that over the years our simple table would develop marks and chips and scratches because with all good, loving use comes accidents. Funny enough, when we bought our simple table, the salesman asked us if we wanted him to send the table back to the craftsman to create the “rustic look” by beating it with a heavy chain. We said no, we would take it as it was. While many in an “instant age” might have done so, we wanted our rustic look to come from authentic wear and tear. We wanted our simple table to develop a character in its own right over time. We wanted to be able to look at the dents and scratches and remember the wonderful times we have had around our simple table.

Our simple table seats four most nights, but is just as comfortable seating twelve. It’s simple bench style seats means you can squeeze room for one more when you need it. That said, our simple table can just as comfortably seat one. And when you sit alone, it doesn’t feel like the scenes you often see in movies of the one person sitting at the long, big, empty table. Our simple table somehow feels just right no matter how many are seated there.

Our simple table is extremely versatile. Of course, we eat at it. Every day. We never wanted to be an “eat in front of the TV” family. But it does much more than that. Out table has served as an office desk, a sewing table and an operating table for more than one scratched knee. Every year at various times, it becomes the resource creation station for creating teaching resources and then an assessment collation area both for my teacher wife. It has been the place at which businesses were launched, ideas were birthed, songs and books were written and assignments hammered out long into the night.

Our simple table has been host to a wonderful array of events. It has been the venue for our children’s parties, for the planning of weddings and for celebratory dinners and board games evenings with family and friends. But it has also been the place for tears, for sadness and for pain. Heated and hard conversations have taken place here, and across it’s breadth hands have been held. Tightly.

This past week, our simple table has been the venue for some very special moments. Within the last five days, twice we have gathered around it with friends – you know, the type who are more than friends – who we do not get to see very often and ate together. One of those families have lived overseas for many years now and to share food, fellowship and colouring in over our table with them and with their children that we had never met was a great joy.

And as I write this, I sit at our simple table surrounded by party things because tomorrow our simple table will host our daughter’s 14th birthday party. What I love about that is that our simple table was also the place at which she ate her first solid foods, the place where she did her first homework and, if Dad is honest, was the place for more than one quick nappy change…

I love our simple table not because it is a thing, but because it is not a thing. It is not minimal in terms of its size, but in terms of its simple design, its materials, how it was built, its longevity and for the amazing memories it holds, our simple table is very much a symbol of everything being NoXS Minimal stands for.

Simple, stable, built to last. Somehow I think our simple table will be a beautiful anomaly in a throw away world. And I hope that it’s message and encouragement to me in pursuing a simple, NoXS lifestyle will be loud and clear every time I look at it.

Live Simply, Simply Live.

Mark G

I have just returned from a week on the border of Thailand and Burma. Every year, we take students into orphanages, children’s homes and refugee camps and villages in which hundreds of thousands (if not more) Karen refugees have lived – some for as many as 60 years. The Karen fled from their State (an Eastern Burmese State that borders Thailand known locally as Kayin) as the Burmese Army decimated their villages and forced people into labour or simply killed them. This happened during WW2 and continued up until very recently. There are many reasons why this has happened, and historically there are some Karen who probably made things worse. But overall, these innocent people have had to live in atrocious conditions in a strange land for far too long. Let’s put it this way – there are people in the camps who were born there and think that it is home and normal; and many of their grand- or even great-grandparents who fled their originally have long since left this life.

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I could feel very melancholy about this but for three things: Read More

There are many definitions of SOUL. Some equate SOUL with SPIRIT; others talk about the soul’s make-up being of the mind, the will and the emotions of a human being. In trying to define SOUL, I will be speaking about the essence of a person – the REAL YOU, if you like. This comes down to being about things that are essentially unseen, yet are visible in the way that being NoXS Minimal in those unseen things are outplayed in our lives. Read More