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You may remember the old joke:

How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?
Only one, but the light bulb has to want to change.

Confession seems to be the starting point for most endeavours of change. People who want to defeat alcoholism must first face up to the fact that they are alcoholics. Getting things right can only come after realising something is wrong. Which ipso facto means that if change is not happening, one possible cause is that the confessional, realisation point either has been missed or had little meaning.

In terms of conforming to a minimalist lifestyle, it made me wonder if the areas of change I am struggling with in my own journey are hard because deep down I have not yet made the decision to change; and that this is because deeper down, in that area at least, I don’t actually want to change… At least not yet!

Let me give you a few examples:

– Do I really want to spend less on stuff? Or am I really only happy to spend less on stuff I don’t like, need or enjoy? Not buying the latest model car or shunning the next generation iThing isn’t that hard for me because, to be frank, I don’t care. But how many pairs of minimalist running shoes do I need; how many books on the “to be read” back burner is too many; and how many guitars can one guy really play at once?!

– Back on books, am I really serious about saving space and money by converting totally to eBooks?

– Do I really believe stuff you don’t use should be moved on? For example, is it okay to let some of my Dad’s old stuff go? Or am I actually scared my memories will fade if I give away the quilt-lined sleeping bag I have had sitting in the bottom the camping trunk for 20yrs?

– While the idea of having less leading to needing less money leading to not having to work as long or able to do what I love and earn less and not having it matter is great; do I deep down really believe that scaling back financially is the best thing for me and my family at this point? If not, why?

Nothing wrong with these things. After all – as I posted two weeks ago, the NoXS Minimal journey is yours and yours alone. So in reality, you could live with all the above if that’s the type of minimalism you want. But me – I’d like to think that less stuff and/or having it more space and money consciously (like eBooks); letting go of things I have never used and scaling back financially could become parts of the way I live.

Just that first I guess I have to *really* believe it… :o)

What are some areas you would like to happen but realise you have to believe more first?

Live Simply, Simply Live.

Mark G

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When you have been living in a world of “much” for so long, the idea of scaling back to a NoXS Minimal existence can be daunting. So many questions begin to emerge.

Where do I start?
How little is too little?
How much is too much?

And as you start there is the nagging uncertainty that raises other questions like, “Well what if I need that some day?” or “I don’t need it or want it, but my mother gave it to me! What If she asks about it…?!?!”

The best piece if advice I can give you is this:

Your minimal journey is two things: YOURS and A JOURNEY. The rules can be set by you. Only you can say what level of minimalism is right or wrong for you. And being a journey, you can travel at your own speed. It is a process not a destination. Enjoy it.

Many people, myself included, began their journey in the wardrobe. I think most people would agree we love with far more clothing that we need. But in the spirit of YOUR and JOURNEY, here is a great resource I found which is very similar to the approach I took on my first day of going minimal.

PROJECT 333 is a great idea that allows you to ease into minimalism. The idea is that you live for 3 months using only 33 items of clothing. There are some things that are “free” and don’t count, like pyjamas, around the house wear and workout clothes (the restriction being you cannot wear these items for anything else). But the project forces you to look at what you have – clothes, jewellery, shoes etc (yes these count!) – and see if you can live without some of them.

Here is what is cool about Project 333 though – first, nothing bets thrown away (yet)! You are practicing what it might be like to live with this many clothes in the wardrobe. And here’s the other thing – if you find that 33 is realistically too few (which initially you might say it is but give it three I this and you might be taking differently!) because a Project 333 is completely adaptable, you can switch it up to a Project 344 (or 322 if you prefer!) next month and see if that is better for you.

At the end of the three months you can debrief yourself asking questions like:
What was it hard to live without? Why? Is it realistically something I should keep?
Does my lifestyle work with this many items, or should I switch up/down? Or adapt my lifestyle instead?
Was there anything in the 33 items I seldom sore? Do I actually need it/like it as I think I do?

And then, go another round.

All of the “rules” can be found at their website, along with ideas for adaptations and so on. If you give it a try, let me know how you get on… http://theproject333.com/getting-started/

Remember though, your minimal, your journey. Be yourself and enjoy the ride.

Live Simply, Simply Live,

Mark G

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Just last week, something quite sentimental came to an end. It had a life span of, we estimate, 45 years. It had been used by three generations and had come into contact with four. It was a handkerchief. Not just any hankie, mind. It was my Dad’s military issue hankie. And this simple yet practical piece of material has taught me more about materialism and being NoXS Minimal than just about anything else in recent days. Let me share the ways…

1. IT WAS MADE TO LAST
This handkerchief would have found its way into a pocket at least once a week in that 45 years. Who knows how many times it was taken in and out of that pocket? Who knows how many nose blows it took, bleeding wounds it covered, tears it wiped or table spills it mopped? Yet the material chosen and the sewing of the edges has held up. Someone made this to last, not to be thrown away after one or two uses.

2. IT IS SIMPLE IN DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
One colour, four edges. Nothing fancy or elaborate needed – it’s main task was to wait in a pocket until it was taken out to wipe noses and that is what informed it’s make. Need fancy edges? No. Pretty pictures? Who will see them? Not needed! Easy to make means more can be spent on the material rather than the manufacture, which is probably why the material lasted so long!

3. IT WAS USED, NOT HIDDEN
Sounds weird, but I think you will understand – when I was given this hankie, I was considering not using it. It reminded me of my Dad and I was afraid that it would be ruined if I did. But then I realised that my Dad was a practical man who made good use of everything he had or came upon – a trait he inherited from his father. While their extreme of keeping everything until it’s needed was something I wanted to avoid (you should have seen what we had to do when Dad and later, Pa, passed away to clear up their collection of screws, bolts etc etc etc x 100!!) I thought it best to use what I had. This would be an important part of going NoXS Minimal – use it or lose it! So I continued to use! as Dad had, as a way to honour him and because the idea of buying another hankie when I already had this good one (and a few others as well) was a bit redundant.

And so, after 20 years in my possession, it comes to this – a nice, neat tear down the middle where the centre fold had been placed for 45 years or so altogether. Which brings me to the last key lesson – SOME THINGS WILL DIE. And when they do, you get a choice: replace or not replace. Well, with a couple more hankies still in my draw, I think it is safe to leave it for now. Who knows, maybe ask can get 45 years out of them too?

Live Simply & Simply Live,

Mark G

I have just returned from a week on the border of Thailand and Burma. Every year, we take students into orphanages, children’s homes and refugee camps and villages in which hundreds of thousands (if not more) Karen refugees have lived – some for as many as 60 years. The Karen fled from their State (an Eastern Burmese State that borders Thailand known locally as Kayin) as the Burmese Army decimated their villages and forced people into labour or simply killed them. This happened during WW2 and continued up until very recently. There are many reasons why this has happened, and historically there are some Karen who probably made things worse. But overall, these innocent people have had to live in atrocious conditions in a strange land for far too long. Let’s put it this way – there are people in the camps who were born there and think that it is home and normal; and many of their grand- or even great-grandparents who fled their originally have long since left this life.

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I could feel very melancholy about this but for three things: Read More

So I am in the process of packing for a trip. I need to pack relatively light; we have limited space in the vehicles we will be using for our ground movements. As I contemplate how many bits and pieces to take, a question comes to mind that could apply to any scenario in your life where you either want to or need to go NoXS Minimal:

When does going NoXS Minimal change from being a virtue to being stupid? Read More

The most important thing most of us can do to grow spiritually is to stay in the place where we are.’
Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Author, The Wisdom of Stability

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Stability scares me. Putting down roots seems so definitive, so absolute, so final. But I am learning that to endeavour to find some stability could be a key towards more simple and minimal lives. Read More

There are many definitions of SOUL. Some equate SOUL with SPIRIT; others talk about the soul’s make-up being of the mind, the will and the emotions of a human being. In trying to define SOUL, I will be speaking about the essence of a person – the REAL YOU, if you like. This comes down to being about things that are essentially unseen, yet are visible in the way that being NoXS Minimal in those unseen things are outplayed in our lives. Read More