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Micah True - aka Caballo Blanco (The a White Horse) www.ultracb.com

Micah True – aka Caballo Blanco (The a White Horse) http://www.ultracb.com


The other day I was contemplating the economy. Not something I usually do. But a question popped up I could not shake:

“Why does our economy have to grow?”

Now, every economist in the world will be able to give me a plethora of reasons. I even thought of a few myself. But here is the thing: I will bet that every one has as it’s core the need for someone else to continue to make money, and more of it. So one might say, “The economy has to grow so we can employ people as the population grows.” True – but you could employ more people now without the same growth if some of the executives in your company were happy to take home a little less pay. Or the shareholders were happy to take home a little less dividend.

As I chewed this, the concept of Korima came up. Korima is a concept within the culture of the Tarahumara people (also known as the Raramuri). Basically Korima means “What I have, you have too.” It is a simple way of ensuring everyone in the community has what they need to survive. At the same time, nobody presupposes Korima will save them and therefore the Raramuri do not allow it to be a motivation to laziness. This is no communist system in that sense – but instead a commitment to ensuring that nobody in the community lacks anything.

Korima is a challenging concept because it demands that I recognise that I have more than enough; and the more is capable of being given to one who has little. And that even if I think I have (or do actually have) little, I will always have enough to give something to someone with less.

I first became aware of Korima through a man who became my mentor in running and in life. Micah True first moved to the Copper Canyons to live with the Tarahumara to learn how to run from them. (Hint: if you want the full story read Born to Run). But he learned so much more. One of those things was Korima and he was so taken by it that he began to embrace and practice it in his own life.

Korima shone through in everything Micah True (known to the Tarahumara as Caballo Blanco – The White Horse) did. And as he mixed in the running community, he mixed the two and carved out a community among us runners that practiced Korima among ourselves. Unfortunately Micah True passed away two years ago this week while out on a run in the Canyons. But his legacy loves on, especially among the trail and ultra communities that I mix in.

Maybe Korima is not only a great way to start making change (see last week’s post) but also a way to discover what it means to be truly human? What I do know is that John Lennon was right – if people wanted peace more than a TV, we’d have peace – and that Korima might hold the key…

Live Simply and Simply Live
Mark G

(picture sourced from http://www.ultracb.com)

When a young lady was barred from playing in a high school soccer tournament recently in the US for wearing a hijab, next day her team mates and coaches turned up, with her, in hijabs for their next game. They were all allowed to play.

I was taken by this news report (click on the underlined above to see the link) because of the NoXS Minimal way this young lady’s team mates and coaches brought about change. They entered into her world with her and showed others how silly their rule was. In doing so, they showed solidarity with her as well as “sticking it to the man” for her (or rather together with her).

Bringing about change is easy. Gandhi said “Be the change you want to see in the world”. Michael Jackson put it in Man in the Mirror as “If you want to make the world a better place take a look at yourself and make the change.” The bottom line is massive change would happen if we would. Change that is. And a part of that means standing alongside those for whom change is needed (as opposed to needed to change).

Like the young lady in the hijab – her friends took a big risk, identifying with her. But they knew change was needed. And they knew that while they technically were not effected, that they would need to change and enter into her world, risk ridicule, being treated similarly and even possibly losing their place in the tournament. But they knew a stand needed to be taken and if someone was going to bring about change, it would have to be them.

John Lennon once said that if the world wanted peace instead of TV sets, we’d have peace. Sure, there are a gazillion and one ideas that might bring about change. But if none of them change you, they are just not going to make much difference in the long run.

Unfortunately (or fortunately if you like) this is very simple and minimal and requires no connections, dollars or lobbying power. Just the intestinal fortitude to change self for the betterment of the world.

And all of us can do that today.

Love Simply & Simply Live,

Mark G

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Here in Queensland, Australia, the State’s electricity companies run a safety campaign called “Look Up and Live”. It is a reminder to the population that many areas in the State have overhead power lines; and that looking up and making sure the truck you are driving or work you are doing is not going to interfere with the power lines is just as important as checking there is no power running underground before you dig. The catch cry, obviously, is to Look Up And Live.

This has come to mind because my wife said something similar in regards to electronic devices. Our family were in a restaurant and the family of five at the table behind us were all engrossed in their own individual smart-thing. She said she wanted to start a campaign called “Look Up…” to get people, particularly young children, away from being engrossed in the led-lit screens that far too many parents use these days as convenient baby-sitters.

And that is why the power companies’ complete slogan makes so much sense. Are we really living when our faces are buried in our smart-things? Are we really living when our gatherings these days consist of people gathered, yes, but engaged with Instagramming their food or Tweeting someone’s quip or FourSquaring their location or Facebooking what they are doing as opposed to actually doing it.

Perhaps the Look Up And Live slogan is very timely for us right now? Perhaps looking up and living the moment will be far more valuable long term than posting it. Sure, take a picture or Tweet a quote – but don’t do it at the expense of being in the moment. Surely that Tweet or pic can be posted later.

Because let’s face it, not only do we post it, but then we wait to see it appear in our timeline, and then we check other things on our timeline, and then we respond to comments on our timeline, and then we live respond to people commenting on the post we just put up and before we know it, the moment is gone and the conversation has passed and all we have to show for it is a blip in a Universe of information that within the next few hours will disappear into oblivion and will be lost to all, including yourself.

I’m starting today. You meet with me and maybe I’ll take a picture if the moment warrants it. Otherwise, my attention is yours because I want to Live the moment.

Look Up and Live.

Live Simply and Simply Live,

Mark G