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Disclaimer: Yes, I am sponsored by Luna Sandals. But it should be noted that:
A) I bought the review sandals for this review at full price;
B) I have been wearing them for nearly 18 months;
C) I approached Luna for the sponsorship BECAUSE of what I wrote in this review;
D) I had formed my opinion of these sandals well and truly before I was offered the sponsorship (an opinion which, as I mention in point C, pushed me to seek the relationship with Luna that I now enjoy and appreciate).
Okay, that said, let’s get on with it!!

Many readers of this blog will know that my minimalist tendencies also cross over into my sport – distance running. For the long story read the first few paragraphs on my review for Xero Shoes or read the long story short which goes a little something like this…

I have always had an off again/on again love with running – more often off again. This was due to two key factors:
A. Just plain lazy, and
B. Put off because of the injuries that would always come upon me.

I was turned onto the idea of minimalist running in 2006 after reading an article by Christopher McDougall in Men’s Health Magazine about the Tarahumara/Raramuri running people of Mexico. I began running barefoot and in Nike Free, the only other minimalist shoe of the time. The in again/off again continued (due to laziness alone now as the injuries were gone!) until the start if 2012 when I decided to get off the couch and change my life.

By this time, there was a plethora of new minimalist options and Luna Sandals were one of these. Luna were the company started by Barefoot Ted McDonald. Barefoot Ted was one of the “gurus” of the Barefoot/Minimalist movement who was further brought to notoriety via McDougall’s book “Born to Run”. Ted famously had a pair of huarache running sandals made for him from car tyres by Raramuri runner Manuel Luna. When Ted began making sandals, he called them Luna’s in honour of the man who showed him how.

I bought my first Luna’s back in September 2012. I bought the Leadville Pacer: a 9mm trail sandal with Monkey a Grip Technology footbed and the All Terrain System laces. It must be made clear that the Leadville pacer is designed as a trail sandal. My intention was to begin getting out on the trails in sandals – I had been wearing another huarache on the road but needed something that could provide a little more protection. The plan did not quite happen at first. If I am honest, I tried a number of other minimalist shoes for running with the Luna’s being relegated to my casual wear.

So let’s start there – as a casual huarache, the Pacer is excellent. It is comfortable and although when new ground feel was there but a little limited, now after much use there is plenty of feel. Set the ATS laces and you can slip on/slip off the sandal every day and never give the laces another thought. It also looks like a casual sandal as opposed to the traditional huarache lacing that gets people staring. So for everyday lifestyle wear, exceptional.

However all that time, I was wearing and experimenting with a whole heap of other shoes. The Pacers got relegated to shopping, caf├ęs and BBQ’s. Then one day in September of 2013, I out them on for a run. Don’t know why – all I know is that my training log shows that morning of the 23rd, I put on the Pacers and hit the street and came home 11.05km later. And after that, almost every run on road and a few on trail have been run in the Pacers.

The Leadville Pacer is a 9mm thick but light sandal made for trails. It has an aggressive Vibram rubber tread on bottom; and on top a thin footbed of what Luna calls it’s “Monkey Grip Technology”. It comes with Luna’s ATS (All Terrain System) laces which are smooth, flattened tubular nylon straps with a buckle slide for secure fastening. The heel part is made of an elasticised vegan material which allows for a very easy slide on/off once the laces are secured. There is really not much more to say about them because that is all there is of them!

So how have they fared nearly 6 months later of almost daily use? Brilliant!! The Leadville Pacer is currently my go-to running shoe. It is comfortable, reliable and offers great ground feel for it’s 9mm sole. I have worn the tread away under the ball of my feet where my foot falls, but to be fair, Luna make it clear on their website that, “The aggressive tread will wear out quickly on pavement though, so stick to trails with these sandals!” That tread has done me well in wet and dry on trail and (way much more) pavement. And despite the wear, it continues to perform and will continue to, although I think my use has jeopardised the trail life of the sandal. But remember, that is my fault, not the sandals.

I was concerned that the buckle would cause me issues. It hasn’t. On the one occasion it did, it wasn’t the buckle, but the fine sand that got stuck under it (I was running down the beach) that I left there. A quick finger swipe would have fixed it, but I was too proud to stoop down for a quick second and didn’t fix it. I have run along the beach and on trails many times since with no problems (and certainly no need to finger swipe under the buckle every time).

As someone who travels a lot, I must say travel with running gear is a breeze – they take up less room than my tech shirt and shorts in the bag. And they don’t smell!

As I said in the disclaimer, this review was well underway before I began a conversation with Luna about sponsorship. But the performance of these sandals was enough to prompt me to approach them for support of my upcoming running event. I am so glad they came to the party – this is a product I am proud to wear and promote because I believe in it wholeheartedly. So much so, I would have bought at full price the sandals for my event and training for it had Luna needed to decline official involvement.

Some have complained about the price (the Pacers are $85USD plus shipping), but I believe their value for money is excellent. As more and more people get on the Luna bandwagon, Luna Monkey’s the world over are wearing Luna’s in everything from 5k’s to 100mile Ultra’s. And at some of those you will find Luna’s on the podium.

Of course, Luna’s may not suit all as a running “shoe”. If you are a barefooter or used to running in minimalist shoes you will find a transition to a huarache like the Luna easy. But don’t let that stop you – Luna’s are the ideal Lifestyle shoe and it is well worth a visit to the Luna Sandals website to check out their styles.

Running NoXS Minimal for me is about carefree running. No hi-tech, flashy latest doo-dad stuff here. If you are into that, great. But what I love about Luna is it’s down to earth “let’s let running be about running for the sake of running” vibe. Each day, I pull them on and off I go – bit of protection for the soles of my feet with a strap to hold them on. Nothing more, nothing less. And off a I go with a smile on my face.

I love them and look forward to wearing them for years to come.

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When you have been living in a world of “much” for so long, the idea of scaling back to a NoXS Minimal existence can be daunting. So many questions begin to emerge.

Where do I start?
How little is too little?
How much is too much?

And as you start there is the nagging uncertainty that raises other questions like, “Well what if I need that some day?” or “I don’t need it or want it, but my mother gave it to me! What If she asks about it…?!?!”

The best piece if advice I can give you is this:

Your minimal journey is two things: YOURS and A JOURNEY. The rules can be set by you. Only you can say what level of minimalism is right or wrong for you. And being a journey, you can travel at your own speed. It is a process not a destination. Enjoy it.

Many people, myself included, began their journey in the wardrobe. I think most people would agree we love with far more clothing that we need. But in the spirit of YOUR and JOURNEY, here is a great resource I found which is very similar to the approach I took on my first day of going minimal.

PROJECT 333 is a great idea that allows you to ease into minimalism. The idea is that you live for 3 months using only 33 items of clothing. There are some things that are “free” and don’t count, like pyjamas, around the house wear and workout clothes (the restriction being you cannot wear these items for anything else). But the project forces you to look at what you have – clothes, jewellery, shoes etc (yes these count!) – and see if you can live without some of them.

Here is what is cool about Project 333 though – first, nothing bets thrown away (yet)! You are practicing what it might be like to live with this many clothes in the wardrobe. And here’s the other thing – if you find that 33 is realistically too few (which initially you might say it is but give it three I this and you might be taking differently!) because a Project 333 is completely adaptable, you can switch it up to a Project 344 (or 322 if you prefer!) next month and see if that is better for you.

At the end of the three months you can debrief yourself asking questions like:
What was it hard to live without? Why? Is it realistically something I should keep?
Does my lifestyle work with this many items, or should I switch up/down? Or adapt my lifestyle instead?
Was there anything in the 33 items I seldom sore? Do I actually need it/like it as I think I do?

And then, go another round.

All of the “rules” can be found at their website, along with ideas for adaptations and so on. If you give it a try, let me know how you get on… http://theproject333.com/getting-started/

Remember though, your minimal, your journey. Be yourself and enjoy the ride.

Live Simply, Simply Live,

Mark G

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Just last week, something quite sentimental came to an end. It had a life span of, we estimate, 45 years. It had been used by three generations and had come into contact with four. It was a handkerchief. Not just any hankie, mind. It was my Dad’s military issue hankie. And this simple yet practical piece of material has taught me more about materialism and being NoXS Minimal than just about anything else in recent days. Let me share the ways…

1. IT WAS MADE TO LAST
This handkerchief would have found its way into a pocket at least once a week in that 45 years. Who knows how many times it was taken in and out of that pocket? Who knows how many nose blows it took, bleeding wounds it covered, tears it wiped or table spills it mopped? Yet the material chosen and the sewing of the edges has held up. Someone made this to last, not to be thrown away after one or two uses.

2. IT IS SIMPLE IN DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
One colour, four edges. Nothing fancy or elaborate needed – it’s main task was to wait in a pocket until it was taken out to wipe noses and that is what informed it’s make. Need fancy edges? No. Pretty pictures? Who will see them? Not needed! Easy to make means more can be spent on the material rather than the manufacture, which is probably why the material lasted so long!

3. IT WAS USED, NOT HIDDEN
Sounds weird, but I think you will understand – when I was given this hankie, I was considering not using it. It reminded me of my Dad and I was afraid that it would be ruined if I did. But then I realised that my Dad was a practical man who made good use of everything he had or came upon – a trait he inherited from his father. While their extreme of keeping everything until it’s needed was something I wanted to avoid (you should have seen what we had to do when Dad and later, Pa, passed away to clear up their collection of screws, bolts etc etc etc x 100!!) I thought it best to use what I had. This would be an important part of going NoXS Minimal – use it or lose it! So I continued to use! as Dad had, as a way to honour him and because the idea of buying another hankie when I already had this good one (and a few others as well) was a bit redundant.

And so, after 20 years in my possession, it comes to this – a nice, neat tear down the middle where the centre fold had been placed for 45 years or so altogether. Which brings me to the last key lesson – SOME THINGS WILL DIE. And when they do, you get a choice: replace or not replace. Well, with a couple more hankies still in my draw, I think it is safe to leave it for now. Who knows, maybe ask can get 45 years out of them too?

Live Simply & Simply Live,

Mark G